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Tom Ripley is one of the most interesting characters in world literature."
Anthony Minghella, director of The Talented Mr. Ripley

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When Clara Stackhouse’s body turns up at the bottom of a cliff, her husband Walter finds himself under intense scrutiny after he commits a series of blunders.

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In this riveting tale of a deluded loner, Highsmith reveals her uncanny ability to draw out the secret obsessions that overwhelm the human heart.

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Patricia Highsmith’s story of sexual obsession may be one of the most important, but still largely unrecognized, novels of the twentieth century.

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Falsely convicted of fraud, the easy-going but naive Philip Carter endures six lonely years in prison. Upon his release, Carter is a much more discerning, suspicious, and violent man.

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In the first Ripley novel, we are introduced to the suave confidence man whose talent for murder and self-invention is chronicled in this and the four subsequent Ripley novels.

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Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995)

Born in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1921, Patricia Highsmith spent much of her adult life in Switzerland and France. She was educated at Barnard College, where she studied English, Latin, and Greek. Her first novel, Strangers on a Train, published initially in 1950, proved to be a major commercial success and was filmed by Alfred Hitchcock. Despite this early recognition, Highsmith was unappreciated in the United States for the entire length of her career.

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An art forgery scheme Tom Ripley set up a few years ago is threatening to unravel and he must go to London to put a stop to it in the second Ripley novel.

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From this collection of twenty-eight previously unpublished stories, a remarkable portrait of the American psyche in the mid-twentieth century emerges, unforgettably distilled in unique Highsmith fashion.

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Highsmith writes about men like a spider writing about flies."
The Observer

A video featuring Alison Bechdel, Terry Castle, Robert Weil, and Joan Schenkar discussing the writing of Patricia Highsmith.

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The Black House eerily evokes the warm familiarities of suburban life: the manicured lawns, the white picket fences, and the local pubs, each providing the backbone for Highsmith’s chilling portraits.

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